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. >> with more and more shoppers seeking out handcrafted and traditional gifts, germany's famous christmas markets struggled to keep up with the demand. tens of thousands of egyptians are out protesting against president morsi at this hour after an islamist-led assembly raced through the approval of a new constitution, a move to end the crisis. >> the document is based on sharia law. critics say it ignores fundamental democratic principles and marginalizes the nation's large christian populations. it has set the stage for conflict in a more increasingly divided nation. >> opponents of the president are outraged at the document adopted by the assembly. protesters are maintaining a vigil, and demonstrations are growing. critics warn that egypt is fast becoming an islamic state. >> hosni mubarak never divided the egyptian people. now, there is president morsi, and we do not know if he is the president of egypt or the president of the muslim brotherhood. >> islamists who dominate the assembly have already answered that question -- the body signed off on all 234 articles of the constitution, wh
are as different as germany and greece. what is it that keeps the united states together? you had a great depression here in the 1930's. things were awful. and yet, i do not believe there were any political movements to get rid of the deficit states from the united states, like there are in europe and portugal and spain and everywhere else that happens to be in deficit. the reason is, the federal- state, especially after 1929 plays the role of the regulator of surplus and deficit recycling around the land. let me give you a simple example. we are in seattle. boeing is sponsoring the lectures. when boeing goes to washington to give a contract for the next generation jet or whatever, they may get it. they do get it. but there are some things attached. like for instance, we want a factory that builds the wings are the engines in tennessee or missouri or arizona. in the deficit regions. this is not philanthropy. this is an act of recycling surplus so the surpluses of the surplus state can continue to be created, produced. you may recall that in the 1920s, internationally, we had a gold stand
markets incidentally, too. bond markets, the fixed income markets, here we're seeing buying in germany at the moment and 10-year german bund around 3%. a little bit of buying into the gild as well as some of the safe haven trades back on. we have this italian bond auction. the first one is going to be settled in 2013 and the last one in this year, as well. it's thought that it is going to see solid demand given that it hasn't gotten any trouble getting off the ground as of late with those bond auctions, as well. a quick wrap on the forex market. here you're looking at selling in the euro/dollar right now. 1.3190. we're flirting with the high level of this trading range that we've been stuck in. dollar/yen, it's thought when this new japanese government coming into place, they're simulating the economy and to make sure a weaker yen is in place, as well. kelly. >> louisa, thanks. we're keeping an eye on gold today. could the precious metal be losing its luster come 2013? we'll find out why kuts has decided to cut exposure to the precious metal for the first time. >>> hello, everybody. we
and at the bottom. >> germany is doing relatively well in the crisis. they are doing relatively well, and they will discover that they had some problems, but what is really amazing is to watch the conservatives in this country about germany as an icon that austerity which they really don't. but why is germany able to export so well and pay higher wages by our standards? they have a very extensive welfare state to a level that is beyond the wildest american progress is that what they have is among other things, very good technical the education. a very close collaboration between the educational system and the industry and government, the system of corporate governance that is much more like what we used to have in this country represented on the boards. all of this suggests if you really want to be able to get higher in the global economy want to move in the opposite direction from all the people say that we must you actually want a more integrated and more cohesive society. >> they have done much better in this crisis and they've grown faster in the they've been more stable. >> if y
's germany. other countries, which have reduced carbon emissions have done so because their economies have collapsed, places like russia, eastern europe. and for the rest of the world growth has basically meant increases in carbon. so the idea that comes from mainstream economics that you can decouple carbon from the size of the economy is not at all born out over the last 20 years. >> it's born out of germany. if someone can do it, it can be done, right? is that the answer? >> well, they've had very little slow gdp growth. and there they are an unusual economy. they've been able to export a lot of their -- big export surplus. >> everyone want to be germany. in the future, we will all be net exporters. >> can i make what is going to sound in this context like the naive case for growth and remind us why -- >> i want you to. >> why it's actually important? so, you know, let's stipulate yes, climate change is really important and, yes, juliet is absolutely right. it's really hard to do both at the same time but we have to be really careful to sort of -- it can be easy to say, let's forget abo
to get the latest news. looking for confidence out of germany's ifo survey. if we can put it up on the screen, that would be a help as i'm working to get it up at the moment. as soon as we get the numbers on that front, i will bring them to you. looks like we're still waiting on that. in the meantime, send in your thoughts, questions and comments about the program to worldwide@cnbc.com. and the biggest news of the morning, we have a deal. after 14 hours of talkes and months of negotiations, an agreement has been reached on a pan european banking supervisor. european finance ministers say they've drawn up plans to allow the ecb to directly supervisor the three largest banks in each country except for the uk and sweden which have both opted out. european leaders need to give their seal of approval and silvia wadhwa is in brussels with the latest. sylvia, it sounds like the meeting went into the late hours of the night. it sounds like the uk and sweden got their way. how significant is this agreement? >> the early hours of the morning. one may wonder whether that's good news for sw
. among those closed include spain and germany. we're start with asia. shanghai composite is the outperformer. you saw up 1.6% there. here is a list of the markets closed across europe. germany, switzerland, germany and austria. for the bourses that are open, we can take a look at performance this morning and then we'll take a look over at the bond wall. the ftse 100 is down about .4%. ibex down .5%. not a clear picture. definitely mixed trade as people look to close out the year. the bond wall gives the sense for what kind of wall dominates. we're seeing bond yields move higher. investors are exiting the asset class today. italy around the 4.5% level. we've seen these predominant for several weeks and likely a quick check on forrus. the yen, an important one to keep an eye on, as well. dollar/yen firmer, continuing the patterns that we've seen over the last couple of trading sessions. for more on what to expect from markets today, we're joined by chris meyer, managing director and chief strategist from loop capital markets. chris, good morning. we wake up without a deal.
processing firms are leading the recovery. >>> and germany's latest exports seems to be recession proof. it's a tradition dating back to the middle ages, but germany's christmas markets are more popular than ever. nbc's andy eckh artson sends this report. >> every december, music rix out across girlny's favorite christmas market. berlin alone hosts more than 80 markets, each with its own character where the sights, sounds and smells of christmas combine to keep your financial crisis at bay. >> we don't feel a crisis. when you look around here at the christmas market, you meet so different people from germany and it's so popular to come to berlin. christmas season is present season. >> over the past 20 years, germany's christmas markets have become a big attraction and big business. analysts estimate that the german christmas market industry brings in billions of dollars annually. for many small businesses and traditional craftsmen, the markets are the main source of income for the year. makia, one of only ten mammoth ivory carvers in germany has seen his annual turnover grow since 2003. eve
. >> they brought him gold, frankincense and myrrh. >> very good. the christmas degree originated in germany based on a prop in a mid evil play commemorating adam and eve then came over to england and eventually the united states. do you know what country the christmas tree tradition came from? >> norway. >> united states? >> isn't it from norway? >> netherlands? >> united states. >> germany? >> germany? >> germany? >> am i right? >> i don't know. i'm just guessing. >> i am german ancestry. >> that hurts that you didn't know that? >> it does. >> what's that big thing right over there. what do you call that. >> a christmas tree. >> i think it's called a christmas tree. can you call it whatever you like as long as the people are with their families there is nothing wrong with it? >> they are calling it a holiday tree in rhode island because they want to be politically correct. >> it's a christmas tree. >> it's a christmas tree. >> i love christmas. >> you know there is a war on christmas, right? >> i haven't heard. >> no. you haven't heard of the war on christmas? >> no. how can you have a war with
, as opposed to adam lan za and what triggers this. think of germany, germany in the last three year has had three mass shootings, and they've had the strictest gun control laws in the world. including psychological profiling. and 2011, czech republic, nearby germany, has very lax gun control, they have not had this type shooting. >> so there's nothing we can do? we need to be complacent in the fact that we can send our children to school to be assassinated? >> no, i think that one of the problems we have on the gun control debate is it immediately starts dividing people into, you disagree with me, therefore, you're the enemy. i've opened up saying let's put gun issues on the table. let's include mental health. video games, home back ground in there. and i think where there is common ground, you could say the storage of weapons. but when we immediately start saying, well, you want this, therefore you dislike children or whatever, it's not productive to the debate. and i want to point out, i've been in congress for a long time, i can tell you, gun control debates are very, very difficult. and
. but basically issue selection. within germany the companies have done well, in general it has been an issue selection. ashley: you think of areas being well, europe is not one of them. he mentioned germany, even germany is being dragged down to what is going on in the region as a whole. how do you pick the stocks? you like the multinationals, don't you? >> one thing that we have invested in his multinationals. companies around the world, spain, peril around the world. cars around the world. multinational companies that are doing stuff right in this environment. we think that is the formula, broad-based market and the people that are executing within that. ashley: aren't you concerned about continued volatility in that area? italian elections coming up in february, german elections not far behind that, has to be seen whether angela merkel can survive that. does that give you cause for concern? >> there is no question about that. every election that has happened in the last two or three years, the incumbent has been evicted from office. you can worry about angela merkel, our guess is she is d
is fascinating bearing in mind where we are in terms of the macro story and germany might well be floating -- >> certainly a big departure in the sense that the german stock market has typically traded in line with the german economy and this is a big divergence. so that's a change. but looking over time, all stocks have the component of what they call the economic return. speculative return which is it for change and the valuation that the market puts on it. over time, one is a possum gain and the other is zero sum gain. sometimes good news, sometimes bad news. but over time the kind of net being nothing. >> we'll see what happens. good to have you on. we'll be out in westminster, joined by the british shadow business secretarier to. we'll talk currencies. find out why one strategist is bullish on the currency. after the ramp up in m&a that we've seen this year, we'll also speak to an expert in los angeles that says the fundamentalses for deal activity in 2013 are looking more solid. so where will the money flow in the new year, that's at 11:20. and the outlook for u.s. credit market appe
won't do particularly well, but germany and italy maybe next year have a potential surprise on the upside. >> how much of a surprise? >> it will not be a fast recovery. the ecb will be forced to do more, but they'll be drald dragged into it. so things will have to get worse before they act. so i don't really think -- >> what more actions? they have a t program waiting to go. what more actions are you talking about? >> the key policy rate for the ecb is likely indeed in the first quarter. they can take dpopt deposit rate negative. by the middle of next year, they'll be doing outright qe. i've been talking about this for ages. they haven't done it so maybe they won't do it. but i'm assuming that the outlook for inflation for the eurozone is -- >> how are they going to get around -- look, i know the bundes bank has a fear of hyper inflation. i just don't -- are they going to get around all the -- because even if they do it on the inflation mandate, are they going to get around the objections about outright money printing? germans would see it as that. >> they would see it as ou
twice as much as canada and germany. more than twice as much as britain and japan. rationing is supposed to be the lower cost, the american way of rationing costs more. what do we get for all that money? 41 countries have higher average life expectancy. 40 countries have a lower infant mortality rate than we do. we have one of the poorest records of actually curing people of curable diseases in the western world. of our spending still leaves millions without health coverage. does the affordable care act continue or does it disrupted the american way of rationing? i could say it does a little bit of both, but at 2500 pages that actually does a lot of both. first of all, by requiring insurance companies to accept people with preexisting conditions obamacare strikes a major blow against rationing by health condition. i don't think it is possible to overstate the significance of this because it is telling insurance companies they have to fundamentally change the way they do business. their job is to cover sick people as well as healthy ones and that is a very big change for the american insu
and the support groups and we proceeded to attack across into germany. >> there's much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. >>> 71 years ago following the bombing of pearl harbor, the u.s. entered world war ii. they then moveded into germany and witnessed firsthand horrors of the haolocaust. you're about to see stark images of the war, sights that waitzman say still live with him to this very day. >> our first contact is what we call the holocaust. there was a city of dinslaken. we were greeted with thousands of dead bodies. it was conveyed to us later that the germans poured gasoline on people and burn them alive. we went to nordhausen. we went to this camp. after neutralizing their fire and lowering down the gates, we were again greeted by thousands of dead bodies. we came to a crematorium area. there were 10 or 12 ovens in that camp. most of them the doors were very hot. we got them open, found bones and ashes. we had no idea what to do for these poor people. we gave them sips of water and to not try to do anything else. the medical detachment got there short
and insulatedding old buildings and creating renewable energy economy like they have done in germany. they have 50% renewables. all of germany is 25-30% renewables. that's mostly solar. germany has less sun than much of america. the idea that is not an economic solution is a complete falsity. we're totally at the point we can do this right now. i think the, you know, we're really in a situation where there's an old paradigm, the oh oh post oil revolution, industry which is very powerful and strong, perhaps the strongest in the world. they obviously want to continue to do things within their paradigm and with their own interests in mind. that's how the free market works, i guess but we have to enlighten the people and make them understand there is nothing safe about this. it's just as dirty as coal, it's going to cause climate change. it's not which fossil fuel we like. this is all about climate change and obviously having clean air and water is important but if we tip the earth into unlivable environment, everybody suffers. in fact, a lot of us are going to perish. so, you know, it seems overly dr
to the rest of the world, if you look at germany, uk, japan, france, all of whom have very strong gun regulations, we have more gun deaths in one week than they have in an entire year, and the incidents -- the number of times in which guns inside a home are used for self-defense are exceedingly small, on the order of maybe 1 in 15, 1 in 20 as compared to the number of times when a gun is used either for suicide or a homicide. anybody that looks at the data here is quite clear that on the whole, particularly things like assault weapons, create far, far more kor nage in th carnage in this country than they prevent. to a large extent the reason why i think progressives have not been able to mount an effective campaign for sensible gun laws, it's been a failure of the progressive movement, and i think that will now change with progressives. they must realize they have to make this an election issue. all of the polls show that the public is widely in favor of sensible gun regulations. i will point out what i said on friday. president clinton after columbine when we were meeting in the oval
be integrated into how a nation gets its power. more on that after this break. >>> in germany right now there's been a real revolutionary transformation of the grid there. i have some video looking at what the kind of new german energy future or present looks like. you have times when half the power in germany is being produced by renewables. you have a tremendous explosion of wind and solar generation. how did this happen, dave? how did germany begin to undertake this? >> it's a fascinating story. the german law doesn't cost -- this is what it says. it doesn't cost the government any money. electric rate payers pay an extra fee to subsidize people who install solar or wind. people who install solar and wind are guaranteed a higher than market rate of return for something like a decade. these are called feed-in tariffs to keep with green's, you know, aptitude for great terminology. >> screw it. tomorrow we're doing an how on that. >> yes. i had dinner with the parliamentian in germany that got this passed last year. i asked him, this one law is like a lever transforming one of the biggest ind
in germany or alabama. want them in lexington, kentucky or china? >> you mentioned germany. volkswagen opened a plant in chattanooga a few months ago, 2,000 new jobs. bob corcoran was down there. 2,000 jobs, every one of which started at $14.50 an hour. >> right. they're not all going to be at -- >> so volkswagen was moving these jobs here because we're the low wage country compared to germany. >> dude, are you suggesting we push these jobs away? >> i'm not. >> i would rather americans have a shot at a $17 an hour job than having it in china. >> i agree. >> find a way to do better. i actually agree with you. but you have to understand the consequences are pretty severe for american lifestyles. >> again, though, i'm sorry, mike, but the consequences are, we have two choices, we can't get 1965 wages, we either have these jobs in china or lexington, either have them in alabama or germany and this is at least for some of -- a chance for younger americans to get some good jobs. >> joe, if you're taking a job that pays $14.50 an hour. it means one of two things, a, you don't have a job so you're ge
, 1.63. and bond yields higher. they got kicked higher in germany post that survey which we broke on the show, as well. as far as the currency market, dollar bit under pressure ahead of the fed. euro/dollar 130.08. we were down late friday and early monday trade, as well. dollar/yen, highs polls suggest mr. erbe will be a clear win in japan. however big will the lead be and what influence tell have on the bank of japan. dollar and yen pressured by more q.e. talk. and aussillar three-month high. the prospect of q.e. boosting commodityets. canadian doing well. firm at 1.6122. we have more on the asian trading day out of singapore. >> reporter: hi, thank you, ross. most asian markets finished on a bright note. the shanghai composite recouped morning losses in positive territory. property stocks turned higher in the afternoon. stocks also rallied while investors await beijing's detailed plan on urban development. strengthening main line blue chips pushed the hang seng to a 16-month high. developers, industrials, and gaming stocks among the top gamers today. >>> in japan the country's
to this, ambassador burt was the u.s. ambassador to the federal republic of germany from 85-89, and before that worked in the state department as assistant secretary of state for european and canadian affairs and 83-85. and before that was the direct of political military affairs in the department of state. so he, along with his colleagues, has a long and eminent involvement of these issues but and finally last but not least, ambassador matlock, known to many of us, career ambassador, he's been holding a series of academic posts. i'm not going to list them all, since 1981, 91, excuse me. but during his 35 years in the american foreign service, 1956-91, he served as ambassador to the soviet union from 1987-1991, a special assistant to the president for national security affairs, and senior director for european and soviet affairs on the national security staff from 83-86. and as ambassador to czechoslovakia from 81-83. i will not go over the rest of his eminent and long career in the interest of time, but i just did want to give you a brief recap of all three of them. and, of course, marvin
that account for rising income inequality in canada or, indeed, even in france, in germany, in the united kingdom? i mean, it's happening all over the world, it's also happening in emerging markets. but i think it is important to face that scary because if you see it just as a political phenomenon, you know, you're going to lose sight of what i think is the biggest challenge which is that these, actually, quite benign economic forces, right? i love the technology revolution, i'm a google addict. they're also drivers of social and political consequences which are not quite so benign. the way i like to look at it, and this is a quote from peter orszag, is, you know, how he sees it is he said, look, the big drivers are probably these economic forces, but the issue is that particularly in the united states the politics instead of trying to mitigate these very powerful economic forces has exacerbated them. so even as you have these economic forces creating much, much more concentration at the very top, you expect politics to sort of try to so much that blow. social institutions to soften that
germany to somehow get revenge against hitler. they were looking after their only tribal interests, they were not patriotic, and in a funny way he accused the jews of everything that billy graham's and protestants accused his son of when he ran for the presidency in 1960. he didn't believe it was possible to be a jew and to be a true patriot at the same time and those who opposed his son's election because he was roman catholic he said you couldn't be a catholic and a true blooded american at the same time because they couldn't turn him down. is it true kennedy's views about the future of the stock market was influenced by his bootblack one day was giving him advice on the marquette and supposedly kennedy had said on his way to his office he thought something is wrong when they give me advice? >> it's a great story. i found no evidence. it may be true. there are some stories they found no evidence for. i didn't include it in my book because i couldn't verify it. but kennedy didn't need it to tell him that. kennedy was really smart. and when you look back at the crash of 1929, as wh
my wife and daughter in germany. i miss you, love you and will see you soon.it comes we understand. milies fa, at usaa, we know military life is different. we've been there. that's why every bit of financial advice we offer is geared specifically to current and former military members and their families. [ laughs ] dad! dad! [ applause ] ♪ [ male announcer ] life brings obstacles. usaa brings advice. call or visit us online. we're ready to help. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair contains both an anti-inflammatory and a long-acting bronchodilator working together to help improve your lung function all day. advair won't replace fast-acting inhalers for sudden symptoms and should not be used more than twice a day. people with copd taking advair may have a higher chance of pneumonia. advair may increase your risk of osteoporosis and some eye problems. tell your doctor if you have a heart condition or high blood pressure before taking
cheaper? europe. >> germany and france at two-week highs last week. >> there's a few countries over there. i like the relative value there. they've got a printing press. they're going to open that. what i learned is you don't fight the tape and don't fight a bailout. i've got about 30% off this country -- outside of this country. and added 10% in emerging markets. now i think that we've had a bloodless revolution again in china, i think it's a great place. look at emerging markets. better value while you wait around. >> and they've done well over the last year. it was just they've been the silent gain. you haven't quite realized they've been doing so well. >> i like it. i wouldn't rush into anything. if you hid cash on the side, what a good time getting in. >> this market has stopped reacting on a minute by minute basis to all the prognostications out of washington on the fiscal cliff. what do you make of that? are we becoming complacent? are we immune? what are you talking about on the floor? >> we just had the president speak. nothing there. china numbers tomorrow. then germany. maybe n
and finance merging, finance taking over industry, which was what pretty well happened in germany. this was never the case. the united states had a very, very broad financial ostentation . the decentered financial system and one in which financial markets therefore broaden the but not linked directly to particular industries. in their function became that of developing financial instruments which will allow finance to go into the market as individual firms and issue commercial paper to raise their money rather than getting it to wrigley from lynx to particular financiers. that led eventually to the world emulating the rest of the markets. the german banks which were so closely integrated into their industry. deutsche bank is not in distinguishable from goldman. and it explicitly said is a began to shift toward becoming an investment bank along the lines of wall street's, we would be engaging conflict of interest if we are writing ipos for firms that now we are deeply integrated with. they end up owning almost all the mortgages in black cleveland at the time of the 2000 crash. deut
. in austria and germany, the unemployment rate is about 5%. it has been 164 days since julian assange seeked silence in ecuador. he is wanted for questioning in sweden over allegations of sexual assault, but the price tag has cost the taxpayer over $3 million. >> he is the man that shot to fame for selling state secrets when he website released confidential american cables. in 2010, to swedish women accused him of sex crimes. faced with extradition, he fled to the embassy saying the swedish authorities did not guaranteed not to send them to the u.s.. to promote a new book he has written, he speaks out. >> the swedish government refuses to behave in a way that is at all normal, rational, were reasonable. that is why i have been granted political asylum. >> they say he must face questioning. they are outside the embassy 24 hours a day, waiting to arrest him the moment he walked out. it has cost 21 million pounds and counting. he is reported to be eating a lot of take away food, running on a treadmill and using a special lamp to get vitamin d. he appeared in robust health despite suggestions th
and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3% or greater. >> if we do it now, w
, in germany, jewish and muslim groups expressed relief after the government passed a law this week explicitly protecting the practice of circumcision. earlier this year, a local german court had ruled that circumcision amounted to bodily harm. that decision did not ban circumcision but many feared it could open the door to criminal charges against those who performed it. jews and muslims argued that would have infringed on their religious freedom. on monday, united nations human rights day, protests were held in several countries in support of tibet. the number of tibetans who have set themselves on fire to protest chinese rule has grown dramatically. this week, a 17 year old girl died after committing self- immolation, one of eight people under the age of 18 to have done so. activists say the number of self - immolations over the past three years has risen to more than 90. close to 30 occurred last month alone. at the vatican ts week pop benedict the 16th officially joined the twitter sphere, with the launch of his new twitter account. the pope used his allotted 140 characters to send out
it better. >> reporter: for jeffrey chase, he was hoping to see his mother- in-law in germany before her open heart surgery. >> the worst that happens is nobody comes. >> most did give up and had to change their travel plans. but for a handful of people who had a life or death situation, they were able to get a new passport. >> you can see it. there it is. >> reporter: that brand new passport. the duty officer we ran into didn't want to talk to us on camera, but the story has a mice christmas ending. the duty officer told us he drove in from naapa on christmas eve and said he would hope others would do the same for him if he were in a similar situation. in the newsroom, grace lee, cbs 5. >> thanks, grace. >>> the marks closed early but wall street had enough time to lose ground. the dow lost nearly 52 points. nasdaq fell 8. the s&pa hundred dropped almost 3-pointa. >>> the stores are busy with shoppers, but are they actually buying? according to the latest figures from shopper track, sells fell. shopper track now expects holiday spending to be up 2.5%. that's down from prior expectations
. >> the american defense secretary announcing that the u.s. was joining germany and benevolence in providing patriot missiles. does this risk raising the stakes? >> i see these as predominantly a defensive move. i think the assad regime knows it is a defensive move. they can theoretically be used to shoot down planes, this is probably not going to happen. they are far too expensive to use for that purpose. >> syria's most important ally has already responded, saying that the american missile deployment creates extra tension and is not help for a diplomatic solution. it does put the spotlight again on the volatile a syrian-turkish border. an area given support to the rebels. the patriot missile sites have not been disclosed. all will be under nato command and control. >> significant elements in syria. four days, they had been celebrating in p'yongyang after a successful missile launch. today was the biggest display yet. hundreds of thousands were summoned to show their enthusiasm to the world. the launch came just 8 months after a similar attempt ended in failure. we report now from seoul. >>
annual santa claus running competition in germany. >>> when we come back, some of our bravest serving our country and serving well past active duty. that axiron is here. the only underarm treatment for low t. that's right, the one you apply to the underarm. axiron is not for use in women or anyone younger than 18. axiron can transfer to others through direct contact. women, especially those who are or who may become pregnant, and children should avoid contact where axiron is applied as unexpected signs of puberty in children or changes in body hair or increased acne in women may occur. report these signs and symptoms to your doctor if they occur. tell your doctor about all medical conditions and medications. do not use if you have prostate or breast cancer. serious side effects could include increased risk of prostate cancer; worsening prostate symptoms; decreased sperm count; ankle, feet, or body swelling; enlarged or painful breasts; problems breathing while sleeping; and blood clots in the legs. common side effects include skin redness or irritation where applied, increased red blood c
, not well. we have declineds in germany, london. these declines are not massive. the reason for that, this has been well flagged for a long time. the market has slowly been discounting it for the best part of a couple of months. however, there is still optimism a deal will be done or a little late, a cliffhanger. >> people are saying it is just brinkmanship that in a few weeks that will have a deal. >> if there is not, then things start getting messy. i was speaking to analysts in the city and they are very worried about that possibility. they are still hopeful is not going to happen. >> good news for the world second-largest economy. >> excellent news out of china. pmi is an index or the ask people how confident you are feeling, indicating the fourth quarter of the year, china has seen a very marked pickup in economic growth. that is extremely good news because china had been having a pretty sluggish time of things over the course of the first half of 2012. this is leading the optimism that 2013 could break away from the economic doldrums. nonetheless [indiscernible] >> there you go
taxes have done in europe and southern europe. france and germany about going into recession. japan is already in recession. why apply the poison here. you don't put it on taxes on the economy and why put poison in the patient. i don't get it. >> i'm not for tax hikes or anything, but if you kick the can voters are never going to be ready to reform or pay for entitlement reform. don't do entitlement reform. it took two years for reagan to do entitlement reform. sell by date is long past due on these measures to fix fiscal problems. the problem is we're in economic era of falling expectations and that has to stop. >> if we kick the can for six months that gets us to midterm elections? >> yeah, but the flip side of the argument you can pass a lot of bad bills. nancy pelosi, let's pass the healthcare bill so we can see what is in it. the big thing that we need to concentrate on is getting back to 3% growth. this 2% growth, all of our fiscal problems are going to get worse. we only have a prayer of supplying more jobs, bringing down unemployment and braying down the deficit if we have 3
, and there are schools in asia and south korea, germany, where the school is all year and germany towns out a lot of pretty neat engineers and, of course, much of asia turns out a lost great technology types and the rest, so they are getting bang for the education buck. your fear is it would not be copied here? >>guest: no. the trouble is, you have other countries. in finland, they focus on only putting the proper people to have the highest success in the classroom or potential for success in the classroom in education schools. so they don't just let anyone in a school education. >>neil: they look at promising students. you could be a late bloomer and get passed up. >>guest: that is possible. but, instead, what they are doing is scrutinizing people prior to getting into the system. what we do in america, unfortunately, according to international studies, we have students who are graduating to become teachers are in the bottom third of their graduating class. so we are putting people in choose rooms that are not equipped with skills. they do not have the ability to handle a classroom. so what we n
proceeded to attack and cross into germany. >> much more to the story. next, the images he will never be able to forget. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your mark with ink from chase. i wish my patients could see what i see. ♪ that over time, having high cholesterol and any of these risk factors can put them at increased risk for plaque buildup in their arteries. so it's even more important to lower their cholesterol, and that's why, when diet and exercise alone aren't enough, i prescribe crestor. in a clinical trial versus lipitor, crestor got more high-risk patients' bad cholesterol to a goal of under 100. [ female announcer ] crestor is not right for everyone. like people with liver disease or women who are nursing, pregnant or may become pregnant. tell your doctor about other medicines you're taking. call your doctor right away if you have muscle pain or weakness, fee
other countries like germany, the middle-class is in better shape. better trading against the world, companies are making money. a lot of things that we heard that were not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster than ours. there is something wrong inside the american political and economic system. that is what this book is about. >> hendricks mitt is the author. thank you for being an book tv. >> and now bailout, an inside account of how washington abandoned mainstream while rescuing longstreet. he argues that the $700 billion troubled asset relief program or t.a.r.p. program was mishandled. about 40 minutes. >> joining as now his kneele brodsky, a former inspector general for tart -- t.a.r.p. you saw him earlier on a panel. here's the cover of his best seller called "bailout." how did you become the inspector general? >> it is kind of a strange thing, especially for me. i was a federal prosecutor up in the southern district of new york. i spent the years leading into the financial crisis during securities fraud cases an
in the vary sigh settlement and it was obvious that germany could violate that order. beginning around 1922 you had two decades leading to the second world war of the revisionist regime that wanted to revise the structure of global power and the status quo powers. today there is one status quo power and under this administration. >> as to whether these countries are going to enforce this world order? >> look you have three presidents. president clinton, bush and obama have said explicitly a nuclear iran is unacceptable. if the iranians are allowed to walk across that threshold with no opposition that is going to demonstrate to other would be aggressive regimes there is no cop on the street. that is what is happening. >> paul: is this the year of the showdown? >> it's how much industrial mechanics, how much uranium this would be the year. >> paul: there is a computer virus that keeps kicking it down. >> but it's not an ever receiving horizon and they take nuclear stockpiles and how much they have and how deeply it is buried. you saw benjamin netanyahu at the u.n. in september and literally d
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